Dissertation proposal

For my dissertation I am proposing to research the alleged decline of investigative journalism and the implications it can have.

My research will include using resources such as our library and Moodle to use services like Ebsco and UK Newsstand.

My initial idea for my title is, Are investigative journalists still the custodians of conscience?

Having viewed a video of investigative journalist Seymour Hersh speaking at a journalist school in America in 2013, I believe it would be advantageous to look at his work on the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam that won him the 1970 Pulitzer Prize.

It may also benefit me to look at his books Chain of Command, The Dark Side of Camelot and The Price of Power: Kissinger in the Nixon White House and his writing in 2005-2006 about Iran to see how his work has differed.

Reading the book All The Presidents Men by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein could help with research as well.

Another step would be to contact Pip Clothier to ask him about modern investigative journalism.

Books that I will be, and already am, reading include Lifting the Lid: A Guide to Investigative Research and Investigative Reporting: A study in technique.

There will be reference to the Leveson report and the constraints it has put on modern journalism, reference will also be made to certain freedoms that members of the press enjoy due to the nature of their work.

The reporting of the Hillsborough disaster from the day it happened and subsequently in the days, months and years beyond will show how dreadful mistakes can be made, and the effect these can have on journalism and ordinary people.

One of the questions I could ask would be if anything similar to Watergate could happen now thanks to investigative journalism, or is it still the highest form of journalistic practice?

I will also research such constraints as financial pressures and the overriding power of business and governmental politics and the effect they can have on investigations.

Speaking to our librarian Carol Wright will be invaluable for research.

Using the Bob facility to find programmes regarding certain subjects will also be very useful.

I will also refer to reading material that I looked at for my essay about press freedom like the book There is no such thing as a free press, by Mick Hume, contacting the author could also be very important.

Researching journalism law, particularly defamation of character, gagging orders and super injunctions taken out in famous cases, will definitely help me to form an argument and pose questions that need answering.

Seeking advice from Nicky Harley will help me to understand the implications of journalism law and my research about it moving forward, my McNae’s book of journalism law will undoubtedly form part of my research as well.

Press coverage of things such as the Fifa scandal, the investigation of doping at the Olympic Games and reporting of the 1984 Miner’s strike can also provide examples of both sides of my argument.

The case of Jack the Ripper, as I have shown before, can also show very valuable lessons of the effect of good investigative journalism, the Panama Papers case will also form an argument that maybe investigative journalism is not in decline?

Google scholar can be very helpful, especially when researching particular cases.

It will be important to stay away from cases such as those involving people like Julian Assange and Edward Snowden because, as pointed out to me, this is about investigative journalism, not whistle blowing cases.

The phone hacking scandal and subsequent closure of the News of the World will raise the question of trust in the press, and what we, as journalists, can do to restore public faith in the industry.

The subject of the effect of social media on journalism could also be taken into account if it can be established that it has any sort of consequences on investigative journalism, either positive or negative.

The core of my dissertation will be about whether investigative journalism is indeed in decline, and, if it is, what are the reasons behind its decline?

There is no shortage of theories about the state of the press today and investigative journalism in particular, and what contributed to its downfall.

Is it because of phone hacking, corruption or lower standards than those displayed by the likes of Woodward and Bernstein?

Do recent investigations like the Panama Papers, the Fifa scandal and doping at the Olympic Games show that, actually, investigative journalism is not in as much of a mess as some would maybe believe?

If it is on the decline, how does it clean up its battered image and regain the trust of the people we serve?

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Courts and Legal System- Reflection

The Cats lecture about reporting on court cases of all kinds in courts such as Crown, Magistrates and Coroner’s Court began with talking about showing emotion like Graham Satchell showed on BBC Breakfast when reporting from Paris yesterday.

We discussed this and mentioned other emotional reports like Martin Lewis in the bulletin when Diana Princess of Wales had died and Murray Walker getting emotional as Damon Hill won his Formula 1 World Championship title as other examples of when it is fair for a journalist to convey emotion rather than appearing to be like an emotionless robot.

It was also interesting to discuss the seemingly inevitable effects of cutbacks the BBC are going to suffer in the coming months/years like the loss of many red button services.

Learning about the courts and the rich vein of stories we can garner from them was something of an eye-opener even after we had all passed our law journalism exam with Telegraph court reporter Nicky Harley last year.

We knew that it was important that, as journalist’s, it’s essential we understand the way the courts work, right down to making sure the door closes quietly when proceedings are underway.

We learnt that summary offences are dealt with by the magistrates court and there might be three lay magistrates who have no legal qualifications, they are all criminal cases but the maximum custodial sentence they can hand down is 12 months for each offence, up to a maximum of 65 weeks.

The main differences between magistrates and crown court are that a crown court can hand out the maximum sentence allowed for a particular offence but a jury must decide that the charge has been proved beyond all reasonable doubt.

A coroner’s court investigates death in particular circumstances and doesn’t determine innocence or guilt but the verdict by the coroner can lead to a trial and criminal prosecution.

The coroner is either a doctor or a lawyer who is responsible for investigating deaths in particular circumstances such as a sudden, violent or unexplained death.

Contempt laws still apply in the coroner’s court and a coroner can give what is called a narrative verdict which is a summing up of the circumstances surrounding a verdict.

Talking about the Coroner’s Court also brought back very upsetting memories for me as I talked about my experience of being at a Coroner’s Court when we had the inquest into my sister Heidi who passed away in December 2006, it was all I could do to hold back the tears especially this close to the anniversary of when we lost her.

We can also tweet from a court although it must be kept to just fact and a journalist must NEVER be drawn into conversation about something they have tweeted from a court.