A Little Jaunt West to East- Day 1

I wasn’t in a very good mood on Saturday 11 July 2015 because I had to get up at 5.00 in the morning and I hadn’t had much sleep the night before, but get up I did with a feeling of a bit of excitement and a bit of tension about what was coming.

Alison Gardner arrived at my flat at 5.30, I’d had breakfast before she got here, and when it got to 6 o clock we set off to the Holiday Inn on the marina which was where we were being picked up at 6.15, carrying plenty of food including chocolate, fruit, breakfast bars and, most importantly, jam sandwiches.

Being stocked up is always a good idea but it can’t half make your neck and shoulders ache carrying loads of food and drink and other stuff in a rucksack on your back.

The minibus was actually early, Darren Palmer picked us up at 6.10, and we went to several other places to pick up fellow walkers, eventually we turned up opposite Darley’s pub to pick up Lisa Jewitt early, and then Darren realised we had missed picking up two other walkers so we dashed off to get them and then came back to find Lisa waiting.

An hour later we were in Castleford outside the Mend A Hose Jungle, home of Castleford Tigers, ready to start our trek back to Hull and the game between our team Hull FC and Castleford Tigers in the Super League.

Start

We set off just after 8 o clock in the morning in bullish mood wondering what the weekend might bring, rugby league was obviously going to be a major talking point but so were practicalities like toilet breaks and eating and drinking.

It depends which way you look at it but it seemed a blessing at first that the sun was out and we were nice and warm and dry and that seemed to lift the already excited mood although maybe not quite as much as the best pair of walking shoes ever seen in Yorkshire.

Footwear

We set a really good pace and were soon walking through places slightly earlier than expected then we had a well earned mini-break in Selby and I was thankfully able to eat and take my medication for my type 2 Diabetes, there was also another photo opportunity.

Selby

After Selby we kept up a punishing speed as thoughts turned to lunchtime and there was a genuine desire to reach a nice country pub so we could sit down, relax and cool off in the shade out of the scorching heat which was by now starting to affect us quite a bit.

Fortunately we found the Fox and Pheasant which is a lovely, traditional country pub and had plenty of ice to put in the drinks, the landlord was obviously very pleased to see a party of 11 charity walkers come in on a Saturday afternoon when there was only one local in at the time.

Fox and Pheasant

A toilet break and a couple of drinks, and nearly toasted jam sandwiches, later and we were ready to carry on walking in the incredible heat and humidity which had dehydrated us in the morning.

Following the Trans Penine Trail is a definite challenge, especially when there’s cows and a bull where you’re walking along the bank of the River Ouse and, of course, they don’t exactly have to aim in anywhere particular when they go to toilet, we were trying to dodge round piles of it for a rather long, uncomfortable distance.

Eventually we got within about 7 miles of the campsite at Newport where we were due to stay that night and left the cows and bulls behind, and the muck, and we had a short break along with Darren and Jodee Sylvester who had come out in the minibus and told us that they had erected our tents and said what a lovely campsite it was.

After a bit more food and drink we set off in confident mood knowing we were coming towards the end of our trek on day 1 and soon came across a sign welcoming us to the historic East Riding of Yorkshire.

Crossing the Border

After completing 30 miles on foot we found we couldn’t walk any further due to a lack of a pavement to walk on and we weren’t going to take any chances on a fast road where cars were travelling easily in excess of 50 or 60 MPH so Darren and Jodee came back out in the minibus to pick us up and take us the last 3 miles to the campsite.

While waiting for the minibus Lisa rang a pub in Newport called The Jolly Sailor and booked us a table for a meal that evening.

On arriving at the campsite we were given a round of applause and a collection soon appeared which the campers had taken for the charity, Life For A Kid, who we were doing this challenge for.

Some of the walkers cracked open cans of lager and Phil Newsom became our official entertainer as he belted out several tunes as he played them on his iPad.

After a shower and a rest we were all ready to go to the Jolly Sailor for the meal we had booked for 8.30, disappointment didn’t really do our feelings justice.

Getting there at 8.10 they weren’t ready for us so we said we would wait in the bar and have a drink, at about 8.45 they came into the bar and took our orders for what we wanted to eat, I ordered a Cumberland Sausage in a giant Yorkshire Pudding with peas, mash and gravy.

About 9 o clock we were told our table was ready and we could go through to the restaurant so through we went.

We were then waiting what seemed a long time so first Lisa and then Jodee went and spoke to them as we grew hungrier and more impatient and I worried because I was breaking out in a cold sweat and my Diabetes was starting to take effect making me feel quite feint.

The response of one of the staff to Jodee telling him we had walked 30 miles that day and were very hungry as a result beggared belief as he replied “Why would they walk that far in one day?”

To say we were disgusted at hearing this is something of an understatement but finally, after waiting more than half an hour we got served with our meals.

To say I was disappointed with the meal itself is also a rather big understatement, it was a cheap frozen Yorkshire Pudding, the type that you can get three for £1 from Asda, as opposed to the home cooked ones that the pub advertised, there were also 3 small frozen sausages that had obviously just been stuck under a grill for a few minutes, instant Smash rather than the proper homemade mash from proper potatoes that they advertised and a tin of peas with a bit of gravy.

Unfortunately by this point I had no option but to eat it because I was so hungry I was feeling sick and, as I’m sure everybody is aware, hunger and Diabetes isn’t a good combination.

After a thoroughly deflating evening we went back to the campsite and collapsed into bed, although I must say that trying to sleep on the floor in a tent isn’t the most comfortable way of spending a night although I did get more sleep than the previous night as sheer exhaustion took over.

End of Day 1

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Hull 10K- Steve Prescott Foundation

A team of runners and representatives of the Steve Prescott Foundation have completed the Jane Tomlinson Asda Foundation Hull 10K to raise money for the charity set up by the late Hull FC, St. Helens and Wakefield Trinity Wildcats player.

Martin Blondel, secretary for the Steve Prescott Foundation, said the idea for a team to do the run came from Super League Fan of Pride Graham Middleton to raise funds for the charity which supports Christies Cancer Hospital, the Rugby League Benevolent Fund and Oxford Transplant Foundation.

Mr Blondel also spoke about a team including Super League legends Barrie McDermott, Adrian Morley, Lee Briers, Gareth Carvell, Alan Hunte and Chico Jackson, which will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in October on behalf of the charity.

Speaking about Graham Middleton, who organised the campaign that had the Man of Steel Award named after Steve Prescott last year, he said, “Graham is a legend for everything he’s done for the foundation.”

After the race Mr Middleton, who had a cortisone injection during the week to be able to run, said he had done it because Steve Prescott still inspires him and will continue to do so.

“I aim to do a fundraiser every year, the main aim is to keep Steve’s legacy alive.

“The fact it was for the Steve Prescott Foundation certainly helped get people on board to do this today.”

Mr Middleton also said that there are plans in place for another fundraising effort next year which will be announced in the coming months which he hopes people will get behind again and members of the team have already been asking if they’re going to do the Hull 10K again next year.

Before the team set off to do the race Mr Blondel also said that there will be a big announcement in about two weeks regarding where the £5000 they’re expecting to raise from the race will be going.

The charity can be contacted by email at info@steveprescottfoundation.co.uk or on phone on 07971792859

20150614_08593020150614_09044720150614_093228 Runners for the Steve Prescott Foundation before the race, Graham Middleton and Martin Blondel and Graham Middleton and Alison Gardner at the start of the race

Hull 10K- National Autistic Society

A team of fundraising runners have taken part in the 2015 Jane Tomlinson Asda Foundation Hull 10K to raise money for the National Autistic Society (NAS).

The event, which is an annual event organised by the Asda Foundation, took place on Sunday 14th June in Hull City Centre and the surrounding area.

Jacqueline Hoe who runs the Hull and East Riding branch of NAS spoke on the morning of the race to raise awareness of the society.

She said, “Our main aim is to provide help, support and advice for parents of children on the autistic spectrum from parents of autistic children.

“We also have family groups, days out and other events that are subsidised for the families or carers of families with children on the autistic spectrum.”

The National Autistic Society has been open for 6 years now and, according to their leaflet, they offer monthly newsletters, training days, conference days, pantomime and sensory, book and DVD library.

The NAS hold two meetings a month to give members a friendly, informal chance to meet and talk with other parents and carers.

Morning meetings take place on the third Monday of every month 10.00am to 12.00noon at Kids, 182 Chanterlands Avenue, HU5 4DJ.

Evening meetings are on the second Tuesday of every month 7.00pm to 9.00pm, upstairs at the New Clarence Pub, Charles Street, HU2 8DE.

There is also a Saturday Fun Group for all the family with a nominal charge of £1 for each child which includes table tennis, lego, sensory toys, arts and crafts among other activities, these take place on the last Saturday of the month 10.30am to 12.30pm at Lonsdale Community Centre, Lonsdale Street, off Anlaby Road, HU3 6PA.

They also provide a play group every Thursday at Lonsdale Community Centre for £1 per child, including during school holidays.

Other fundraising events they’ve held in recent times include a Charity Ball, Family Sponsored Walk and Ladies Shopping Evenings and Family Fun Days but they are always open to new ideas and challenges as well.

The Hull Branch can be contacted in many ways including by phone or text on 07917 040 380, by email hulleastriding@nas.org.uk, their website is http://www.hulleastridingnas.weebly.com and their Facebook page can be found at HulleastridingNas.

Autistic Spectrum is a neurological disorder which is a lifelong disability. Although it can’t be measured officially it is estimated that possibly as many as 700,000 people may have autism in the UK.

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