Hull KR 36 Warrington Wolves 10, Rampant Robins Move Within Striking Distance of Top 8 With Demolition of Wolves

Hull KR turned up the heat on the top 8 in Super League with an outstanding performance to blitz Warrington Wolves at the KC Lightstream Stadium.

The Wolves started this game as slight favourites despite their erratic form while Rovers tried to close in on the coveted top 8 in by following up their impressive win against Widnes Vikings last week.

The first chance of the game came the way of the Robins with back-to-back penalties giving them possession and field position close to the visitors line but the chance came to nothing after their third set on the Wolves line ended with a poor grubber kick which was snapped up by the defence.

The visitors then marched up-field but their own chance came to nothing as Ben Westwood was tackled just short of the line by Liam Salter which led to the handover.

In the next exchange Albert Kelly tried a kick which was charged down by Man of Steel winner Daryl Clark and the chance ended with Chris Hill going over under the posts in the 10th minute to give them a lead against the run of play, the conversion from Declan Patton stretched the lead to 6 points for the men in primrose and blue.

Rovers then marched to the other end and created an opening down their left but Maurice Blair’s kick for Josh Mantellato was cleared up by a well organised defence.

Another penalty to the visitors invited them to the other end again and when they earned a repeat set they had more chance to apply pressure but a dropped pass by Patton gave Rovers the chance to clear their lines again.

The next attack from the visitors ended with a speculative kick by Patton but it was well claimed by Mantellato before Wolves captain Joel Monaghan could pounce.

Referee James Child wasn’t endearing himself to the home support especially when James Laithwaite was allowed to get away with a blatant ball-steal in a two man tackle as loan man Tony Puletua closed in towards a first try for Rovers.

Warrington were getting more into their stride in the second quarter but workmanlike was the best way of describing the efforts of both sides in a very end-to-end affair in the first half with defence on both sides giving the most noteworthy contributions to the proceedings.

Eventually Ken Sio provided a piece of magic in the 36th minute after a fast cross-field move set him free from just over 40 meters out and the winger raced through to cross the whitewash in the right corner, the touchline conversion from Mantellato fell just short to leave the visitors two points ahead.

Rovers then had a second try awarded by the video referee after a kick by Kelly was caught by Monaghan but the ball was forced free after a clash of heads with Kris Welham and eventually Mantellato forced his way over in the 38th minute and then added the conversion to give the home side a 10-6 advantage at half time.

Rovers started the second half with more urgency and forced a repeat set near the Wolves line but Jordan Cox brought that to a stop by knocking on 15 meters from the visitors line.

However the home side soon forced another chance as Ryan Atkins was forced into touch less than 40 meters from the Warrington line but the resulting attack came to an end as a grubber kick from Kelly was snaffled by the Wolves defence.

A penalty for obstruction gave Rovers another attack and this time they took full advantage as Kieran Dixon cut through a non-existent defence and went over under the posts, the inevitable conversion stretched their lead to 10 points in the seventh minute of the half.

The Robins looked much the hungrier and better organised of the two sides and, with Kelly orchestrating the attack, they were making light of the absence of their talismanic captain Terry Campese.

The next Rovers attack saw a speculative kick from Kelly which Sio beat Gene Ormsby to and knocked back to Salter for the centre to just drop down and score in the 54th minute, the majestic touchline conversion from Mantellato made it 22-6 to Rovers.

A mistake by Dixon gave Warrington a chance as he dropped a high bomb under minimal pressure and eventually a quick move across field saw Ormsby slide in at the corner, Patton pushed the touchline conversion wide to leave the men from Cheshire trailing by 12 points after 58 minutes.

A mistake at the other end by Ormsby then gave Rovers another attacking scrum 15 meters from the away sides line but despite the threat Warrington maintained their slim chance by keeping them at bay this time.

A break by Dixon then led to another attack and a deft little grubber kick by Kelly saw stand-in captain Tyrone McCarthy get over the whitewash against his former club, Mantellato missed the conversion to leave the score 26-10 with just under 15 minutes left to play.

Mantellato then added a penalty from 40 meters out in the 70th minute to stretch the advantage to three converted tries for the home side.

A knock on by Warrington after one scrum then gave the Robins yet another attacking scrum close to their line and Kris Welham forced his way over from a delightful pass by Maurice Blair, Mantellato again added the extras to stretch the score to 34-10 with six minutes left on the clock.

Wolves prop Ashton Sims then gifted Rovers another penalty with a little braul which Mantellato duly converted from 40 meters out to make it 36-10 with the final act of the match.

This result will undoubtedly see Rovers deservedly head into their Challenge Cup Quarter Final at home against Catalans Dragons next week with great confidence.

Penalties: Hull KR 6 Warrington 3

Goal Line Drop Outs: Hull KR 1 Warrington 1

Man of the Match: Albert Kelly

Attendance: 7,455

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Interview with Number One Classical Album Singer Rebecca Newman

Rebecca Newman is a very busy lady, in fact she has been for about the last decade, but in recent times her incredible workload has been on a rapid increase.

In 2005 she started busking where she could revealing her enchanting voice to those who could stop and listen, then she started self financing CD’s to engage with a wider audience.

She then started touring to help raise funds for charities such as the Royal National Lifeboat Institute.

Finally, with the help of her fans, known as the Newmaneers, she made the break into mainstream classical/crossover album production with a major philharmonic orchestra behind her as she went to Prague to record her number one selling album called Dare to Dream.

Sitting in the entrance to Hull New Theatre on the teatime a few hours before her appearance there on 17th June the People’s Soprano snatches a bit of time to speak about Dare to Dream, charity work and touring with international superstar Russell Watson, which is what has brought her to the 2017 City of Culture.

Asked about her success as the first ever self-released soprano to go to number one in the classical album chart she tells me how she felt confident when she first set out to do it, but then how that gave way to surprise at actually managing it at the time.

“I felt yes, we can do this when we started about 18 months to two years earlier, but then it was really hard work getting the infrastructure and we didn’t have as much of a pre-order period as I would have liked and pretty much no time on iTunes and Amazon so we kind of relied an awful lot on people buying it in the first week.

“Once it came to it I thought, oh I don’t think we’re going to do it, but then when we started getting the sales figures I was comparing my ranking in the overall top 200 to any other artist who would qualify for the classical album chart, I couldn’t think of anybody else that was actually higher in the chart who would be classical chart eligible.”

We then started discussing the tour which has brought her to Hull this time, I asked her what is it like touring with such a huge star as Russell Watson and, as I would expect from her generally very relaxed demeanor, she seems to be taking it all in her stride saying it’s the same as touring with anybody else, although you can see a definite excitement in her eyes.

“We’re both very professional in what we do, he turns up and rehearses with the choir, we’re almost like ships that pass in the night because we’re almost on different schedules, I’m at the front meeting people before the show while he’s rehearsing, then during the first act he’s on the stage whilst I’m getting ready so we do miss each other quite a bit.

Charity work is the next subject and she tells me about the homeless charity that she’s just become a patron of called Socks and Choc’s which was recently started in Birmingham and she is going to help expand across the country.

“It was set up by a man in the police force who was quite touched by a man dying in a fountain in Birmingham, it was a guy who had been a problem with other officers but he always used to get on with Ian, they used to have a bit of banter.

“He set the charity up as a way to break down barriers and encourage people to do collections and at the last count they had collected 8,500 pairs of socks and they had been distributed and it’s making a very big difference to people, small comforts like that.

“Now it’s expanded to include hats and scarves and sleeping bags and things like that, there’s lot’s of different things they’re doing with the charity but it’s focusing on socks and chocolates, a nice simple message.

“His motto is lot’s of people doing a little bit is better than a few people doing a lot.”

She then says why homelessness is a cause quite close to her heart, “For years I was out street performing and so I would regularly talk to Big Issue sellers and finding out how they’d become homeless like when they’d gone into care and then been in and out of Foster homes and they maybe had problems keeping themselves settled and secure.”

We then continue to the subject of City of Culture and a glint appears in the eye of the York based singer who confirms she would love to be involved in 2017 and then recounts about previous times she’s been working in Hull at things such as the Queen’s jubilee and the Christmas Lights switch on which clearly hold fond memories for her.

“I’m sure there will be lot’s of great events and I’ve been here a few times before so yes it would be great to do something here then.”

Singing with classical group Blake is another recent highlight for the new girl on the classical scene so i asked her if there is much of a difference between singing with them compared to singing with solo stars like Russell Watson or Aled Jones to which she replies that there is.

“When you’re singing with an individual you can be a bit more individual with what you sing, you still have to be sympathetic to the other person and not try to upstage them, you need to be sympathetic to how they sing.

“When you’re in a group you have to appreciate, it has to be a bit more structured, so it’s a little bit less free. But also what you’re getting in a group is bit more layer of a harmony and a different kind of sound and a different kind of sound around you as opposed to when you’re singing with just one other person, so they both have their own benefits.”

Finally chatting about Opera on the Marina, which will bring this wonderful singer back to Hull on 7th July as the headline act, there is again a brightening of the eyes which belies the tiredness that her energy sapping schedule must cause.

“That’s going to be a really great night, there’s some fantastic acts billed for that finishing with me in the evening, good food, good company and it should hopefully be a great night.

Opera on the Marina is taking place outside The Minerva pub with tickets available from HullBoxOffice.com starting at a price of £12.50 and includes Leroy Vickers, Farino and Tre Amici in its line-up.

Rebecca Newman pic